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Poem by Thomas Hood


To ---


Welcome, dear Heart, and a most kind good-morrow;
The day is gloomy, but our looks shall shine:--
Flowers I have none to give thee, but I borrow
Their sweetness in a verse to speak for thine.

Here are red roses, gather'd at thy cheeks,--
The white were all too happy to look white:
For love the rose, for faith the lily speaks;
It withers in false hands, but here 'tis bright!

Dost love sweet Hyacinth? Its scented leaf
Curls manifold,--all love's delights blow double:
'Tis said this flow'ret is inscribed with grief,--
But let that hint of a forgotten trouble.

I pluck'd the Primrose at night's dewy noon;
Like Hope, it show'd its blossoms in the night;--
'Twas, like Endymion, watching for the Moon!
And here are Sun-flowers, amorous of light!

These golden Buttercups are April's seal,--
The Daisy-stars her constellations be:
These grew so lowly, I was forced to kneel,
Therefore I pluck no Daisies but for thee!

Here's Daisies for the morn, Primrose for gloom
Pansies and Roses for the noontide hours:--
A wight once made a dial of their bloom,--
So may thy life be measured out by flowers!



Thomas Hood


Thomas Hood's other poems:
  1. The Boy at the Nore
  2. Stanzas (Is there a bitter pang for love removed)
  3. The Two Peacocks of Bedfont
  4. Written in Keats' УEndymionФ
  5. Sonnet for the 14th of February


Poems of the other poets with the same name:

  • Joseph Drake To --- ("When that eye of light shall in darkness fall")
  • Samuel Rogers To --- ("GO -- you may call it madness, folly")

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