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Poem by William Butler Yeats


The Fisherman


Although I can see him still.
The freckled man who goes
To a grey place on a hill
In grey Connemara clothes
At dawn to cast his flies,
It's long since I began
To call up to the eyes
This wise and simple man.
All day I'd looked in the face
What I had hoped 'twould be
To write for my own race
And the reality;
The living men that I hate,
The dead man that I loved,
The craven man in his seat,
The insolent unreproved,
And no knave brought to book
Who has won a drunken cheer,
The witty man and his joke
Aimed at the commonest ear,
The clever man who cries
The catch-cries of the clown,
The beating down of the wise
And great Art beaten down.

Maybe a twelvemonth since
Suddenly I began,
In scorn of this audience,
Imagining a man,
And his sun-freckled face,
And grey Connemara cloth,
Climbing up to a place
Where stone is dark under froth,
And the down-turn of his wrist
When the flies drop in the stream;
A man who does not exist,
A man who is but a dream;
And cried, 'Before I am old
I shall have written him one
poem maybe as cold
And passionate as the dawn.' 



William Butler Yeats


William Butler Yeats's other poems:
  1. Men Improve with the Years
  2. The Magi
  3. The Municipal Gallery Revisited
  4. Me Peacock
  5. Love's Loneliness


Poems of the other poets with the same name:

  • Menella Smedley The Fisherman ("Fisherman, speak to me; why so lonely")
  • Edgar Guest The Fisherman ("Along a stream that raced and ran")

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