Английская поэзия


ГлавнаяБиографииСтихи по темамСлучайное стихотворениеПереводчикиСсылки
Рейтинг поэтовРейтинг стихотворений

John Gay (Джон Гей)


Part II. Fable 12. Pan and Fortune


Yo a young Heir

  Soon as your father's death was known,
  (As if the estate had been their own)
  The gamesters outwardly express'd
  The decent joy within your breast.
  So lavish in your praise they grew,
  As spoke their certain hopes in you.
     One counts your income of the year,
  How much in ready money clear.
     'No house,' says he, 'is more complete;
  The garden's elegant and great.

  How fine the park around it lies!
  The timber's of a noble size!
  Then count his jewels and his plate.
  Besides, 'tis no entailed estate.
  If cash run low, his lands in fee
  Are, or for sale, or mortgage free.'
     Thus they, before you threw the main,
  Seem to anticipate their gain.
  Would you, when thieves were known abroad,
  Bring forth your treasures in the road?

     Would not the fool abet the stealth,
  Who rashly thus exposed his wealth?
     Yet this you do, whene'er you play
  Among the gentlemen of prey.
  Could fools to keep their own contrive,
  On what, on whom could gamesters thrive?
  Is it in charity you game,
  To save your worthy gang from shame?
  Unless you furnished daily bread,
  Which way could idleness be fed?

     Could these professors of deceit
  Within the law no longer cheat,
  They must run bolder risks for prey,
  And strip the traveller on the way.
  Thus in your annual rents they share,
  And 'scape the noose from year to year.
  Consider, ere you make the bet,
  That sum might cross your tailor's debt.
  When you the pilfering rattle shake,
  Is not your honour too at stake?

  Must you not by mean lies evade
  To-morrow's duns from every trade?
  By promises so often paid,
  Is yet your tailor's bill defrayed?
  Must you not pitifully fawn,
  To have your butcher's writ withdrawn?
  This must be done. In debts of play
  Your honour suffers no delay:
  And not this year's and next year's rent
  The sons of rapine can content.

     Look round. The wrecks of play behold,
  Estates dismembered, mortgaged, sold!
  Their owners, not to jails confined,
  Show equal poverty of mind.
  Some, who the spoil of knaves were made,
  Too late attempt to learn their trade.
  Some, for the folly of one hour,
  Become the dirty tools of power,
  And, with the mercenary list,
  Upon court-charity subsist.

     You'll find at last this maxim true,
  Fools are the game which knaves pursue.
     The forest (a whole century's shade)
  Must be one wasteful ruin made.
  No mercy's shewn to age or kind;
  The general massacre is signed.
  The park too shares the dreadful fate,
  For duns grow louder at the gate,
  Stern clowns, obedient to the squire,
  (What will not barbarous hands for hire?)

  With brawny arms repeat the stroke.
  Fallen are the elm and reverend oak.
  Through the long wood loud axes sound,
  And echo groans with every wound.
     To see the desolation spread,
  Pan drops a tear, and hangs his head:
  His bosom now with fury burns:
  Beneath his hoof the dice he spurns.
  Cards, too, in peevish passion torn,
  The sport of whirling winds are borne.

     'To snails inveterate hate I bear,
  Who spoil the verdure of the year;
  The caterpillar I detest,
  The blooming spring's voracious pest;
  The locust too, whose ravenous band
  Spreads sudden famine o'er the land.
  But what are these? The dice's throw
  At once hath laid a forest low.
  The cards are dealt, the bet is made,
  And the wide park hath lost its shade.

  Thus is my kingdom's pride defaced,
  And all its ancient glories waste.
  All this,' he cries, 'is Fortune's doing:
  'Tis thus she meditates my ruin.
  By Fortune, that false, fickle jade,
  More havoc in one hour is made,
  Than all the hungry insect race,
  Combined, can in an age deface.'
     Fortune, by chance, who near him pass'd,
  O'erheard the vile aspersion cast.

     'Why, Pan,' says she, 'what's all this rant?
  'Tis every country-bubble's cant;
  Am I the patroness of vice?
  Is't I who cog or palm the dice?
  Did I the shuffling art reveal, 105
  To mark the cards, or range the deal?
  In all the employments men pursue,
  I mind the least what gamesters do.
  There may (if computation's just)
  One now and then my conduct trust:

  I blame the fool, for what can I,
  When ninety-nine my power defy?
  These trust alone their fingers' ends,
  And not one stake on me depends.
  Whene'er the gaming board is set,
  Two classes of mankind are met:
  But if we count the greedy race,
  The knaves fill up the greater space.
  'Tis a gross error, held in schools,
  That Fortune always favours fools.

  In play it never bears dispute;
  That doctrine these felled oaks confute.
  Then why to me such rancour show?
  'Tis folly, Pan, that is thy foe.
  By me his late estate he won,
  But he by folly was undone.'



Перевод на русский язык

Часть II. Басня 12. Пан и Фортуна


Молодому наследнику богатейшего состояния	

	Когда ваш Батюшка скончался,
Всяк шулер тут же размечтался,
Себя на ваше место ставя,
Но вас при этом щедро славя,
Хваля без меры, без границы
В надежде крупно поживиться.

Один мошенник самородный
В доход ваш вникнул ежегодный:

	– Великолепен дом хозяйский!
А сад при нём – так просто райский!
Там парк старинный – красотища!
Дубы в обхвате – дюймов тыща!
Бессчётны ценные каменья,
И не заложено именье.
И, коль наличных маловато,
Всё это можно сбыть, ребята!

	Вот так ваш каждый шаг возможный
Предвидел подлый сброд картёжный.

	Коль вор заведомо известен,
Ужель визит к нему уместен?
Соря деньгами без разбора,
Дурак хвастливый дразнит вора.
И я спросить хочу: не вы ли
Как раз вот так и поступили?

	На что же деньги дурень ставит,
Где шулер царствует и правит?
Вы поощряете пиратство,
Чтоб подтвердить своё богатство?
Где нет борьбы за хлеб насущный,
Игра – побег от жизни скучной?
Ах, не блюди закон ребята
Хотя б под страхом каземата,
Из них бы вышли непременно
Большой дороги джентльмены,
Но щиплют вас, и всяк успешен:
И сыт, и пьян, и не повешен!

	Чем об заклад азартно биться,
С портным могли бы расплатиться.
Когда играете вы в кости,
Не вы ль позор зовёте в гости?
Не вам ли лгать придётся скоро,
Чтобы отвадить кредитора?
Не обещаниями ль снова
Вы оплатили счёт портного?
И льстили мяснику не вы ли,
Чтоб срок оплаты вам продлили?
У вас долгов игорных – море,
И ваша честь – всегда в позоре.
Вам лживых рыцарей наживы
Не прокормить, пока вы живы.
	
А как в долгах не захлебнуться?
Именья спешно продаются,
Ещё немного, и владельцы
Пойдут в тюремные сидельцы.
Один пытается, хоть поздно
Работать честно и серьёзно,
Другой становится моментом
Вельможи грязным инструментом
И за вельможные подачки
Решает подлые задачки.

	И вот вам истина святая:
Дурак – добыча негодяя.

	Вчера шумела здесь дубрава,
Но вот в неё идёт расправа.
Что было мощно, стало хрупко:
Вокруг – всеобщая порубка.
И парк погублен будет скоро:
Неумолимы кредиторы.
Послушны сквайру лесорубы:
Повален дуб-красавец грубо.
Затем вот так же дружно, разом
Расправились с почтенным вязом.
И всюду рубка, всюду ломка,
И всюду Эхо стонет громко.

	И Пан, ошеломлён позором,
Сверкнул от горя слёзным взором.
И вот копытом топчет кости,
И вот он карты рвёт от злости,
И ветер, видящий всё это,
Несёт клочки по белу свету.

	– Я ненавижу змей, что ядом
В листве таятся сплошь да рядом.
Улиток также ненавижу:
Я палачей Весны в них вижу. 
И ненавижу саранчу я,
Что нивы жрёт, себя не чуя.
А здесь? Мелькнули кости, числа, –
И над лесами смерть нависла.
Упали карты крест и бубен, –
И вот старинный парк погублен.
И гибнет мир зелёный древний,
И нет судьбы его плачевней:
Моё ничтожит государство
Фортуны вечное коварство.
Она несчастья, зла и смуты
Приносит столько за минуту,
Что насекомых злой армаде
Сто тысяч лет на это надо!

	Фортуна мимо проходила
И с возмущением спросила:

	– Ты ль это, Пан, великий, древний?
Так бабы плачутся в деревне!
Я, что ли, выдумала кости
И, дав жулью, сказала: «Бросьте!»?
Я ль та пройдоха и ловчила,
Что карты метить научила?
Всех менее из тех, с кем знаюсь,
Я игроками занимаюсь. 
Для одного лишь я богиня
Из ста, что карты мечут ныне.
Однако, он – дурак, невежда:
Ведь ловкость рук – других надежда.
Два вида игроков, бесспорно,
Садятся, Пан, за стол игорный,
Но всё ж мошенников, ей-богу,
Меж ними больше – и намного,
И то неправда, что всегда я
Одним лишь дурням угождаю,
Одним лишь дурням счастье (вроде,
Так говорят у нас в народе).
Но глянь: вон лес лежит, порублен.
Моя ль вина, что он погублен?
Не я твой враг, а Глупость. Фартом
Наследник мне обязан. Картам –
Своей бедой: его, дурилу,
Не я, а Глупость разорила!

© Перевод Евг. Фельдмана
18.10.-17.11.2018
18.11.2018 (ред.)
Все переводы Евгения Фельдмана


John Gay's other poems:
  1. Sweet William's Farewell To Black-Ey'd Susan
  2. To A Young Lady, With Some Lampreys
  3. The Quidnunckis
  4. Часть II. Басня 17. Да и НетPart II. Fable 17. Ay and No
  5. He That Tastes Woman


Распечатать стихотворение. Poem to print Распечатать стихотворение (Poem to print)

Количество обращений к стихотворению: 675



Последние стихотворения

Поддержать сайт

To English version


Рейтинг@Mail.ru

Английская поэзия. Адрес для связи eng-poetry.ru@yandex.ru