Английская поэзия


ГлавнаяБиографииСтихи по темамСлучайное стихотворениеПереводчикиСсылкиАнтологии
Рейтинг поэтовРейтинг стихотворений

William Wordsworth (Уильям Вордсворт)


The Thorn


                             I

“There is a Thorn—it looks so old,
In truth, you’d find it hard to say
How it could ever have been young,
It looks so old and grey.
Not higher than a two years' child
It stands erect, this aged Thorn;
No leaves it has, no prickly points;
It is a mass of knotted joints,
A wretched thing forlorn.
It stands erect, and like a stone
With lichens is it overgrown.

                             II

“Like rock or stone, it is o’ergrown,
With lichens to the very top,
And hung with heavy tufts of moss,
A melancholy crop:
Up from the earth these mosses creep,
And this poor Thorn they clasp it round
So close, you’d say that they are bent
With plain and manifest intent
To drag it to the ground;
And all have joined in one endeavour
To bury this poor Thorn for ever.

                             III

“High on a mountain’s highest ridge,
Where oft the stormy winter gale
Cuts like a scythe, while through the clouds
It sweeps from vale to vale;
Not five yards from the mountain path,
This Thorn you on your left espy;
And to the left, three yards beyond,
You see a little muddy pond
Of water—never dry,
Though but of compass small, and bare
To thirsty suns and parching air.

                             IV

“And, close beside this aged Thorn,
There is a fresh and lovely sight,
A beauteous heap, a hill of moss,
Just half a foot in height.
All lovely colours there you see,
All colours that were ever seen;
And mossy network too is there,
As if by hand of lady fair
The work had woven been;
And cups, the darlings of the eye,
So deep is their vermilion dye.

                              V

“Ah me! what lovely tints are there
Of olive green and scarlet bright,
In spikes, in branches, and in stars,
Green, red, and pearly white!
This heap of earth o’ergrown with moss,
Which close beside the Thorn you see,
So fresh in all its beauteous dyes,
Is like an infant’s grave in size,
As like as like can be:
But never, never any where,
An infant’s grave was half so fair.

                             VI

“Now would you see this aged Thorn,
This pond, and beauteous hill of moss,
You must take care and choose your time
The mountain when to cross.
For oft there sits between the heap,
So like an infant’s grave in size,
And that same pond of which I spoke,
A Woman in a scarlet cloak,
And to herself she cries,
‘Oh misery! oh misery!
Oh woe is me! oh misery!’

                             VII

“At all times of the day and night
This wretched Woman thither goes;
And she is known to every star,
And every wind that blows;
And there, beside the Thorn, she sits
When the blue daylight’s in the skies,
And when the whirlwind’s on the hill,
Or frosty air is keen and still,
And to herself she cries,
‘Oh misery! oh misery!
Oh woe is me! oh misery!’ ”

                            VIII

“Now wherefore, thus, by day and night,
In rain, in tempest, and in snow,
Thus to the dreary mountain-top
Does this poor Woman go?
And why sits she beside the Thorn
When the blue daylight’s in the sky
Or when the whirlwind’s on the hill,
Or frosty air is keen and still,
And wherefore does she cry?—
O wherefore? wherefore? tell me why
Does she repeat that doleful cry?”

                             IX

“I cannot tell; I wish I could;
For the true reason no one knows:
But would you gladly view the spot,
The spot to which she goes;
The hillock like an infant’s grave,
The pond—and Thorn, so old and grey;
Pass by her door—’tis seldom shut—
And if you see her in her hut—
Then to the spot away!
I never heard of such as dare
Approach the spot when she is there.”

                              X

“But wherefore to the mountain-top
Can this unhappy Woman go,
Whatever star is in the skies,
Whatever wind may blow?”
“Full twenty years are past and gone
Since she (her name is Martha Ray)
Gave with a maiden’s true good-will
Her company to Stephen Hill;
And she was blithe and gay,
While friends and kindred all approved
Of him whom tenderly she loved.

                             XI

“And they had fixed the wedding day,
The morning that must wed them both;
But Stephen to another Maid
Had sworn another oath;
And, with this other Maid, to church
Unthinking Stephen went—
Poor Martha! on that woeful day
A pang of pitiless dismay
Into her soul was sent;
A fire was kindled in her breast,
Which might not burn itself to rest.

                             XII

“They say, full six months after this,
While yet the summer leaves were green,
She to the mountain-top would go,
And there was often seen.
What could she seek?—or wish to hide?
Her state to any eye was plain;
She was with child, and she was mad;
Yet often was she sober sad
From her exceeding pain.
O guilty Father—would that death
Had saved him from that breach of faith!

                            XIII

“Sad case for such a brain to hold
Communion with a stirring child!
Sad case, as you may think, for one
Who had a brain so wild!
Last Christmas-eve we talked of this,
And grey-haired Wilfred of the glen
Held that the unborn infant wrought
About its mother’s heart, and brought
Her senses back again:
And, when at last her time drew near,
Her looks were calm, her senses clear.

                             XIV

“More know I not, I wish I did,
And it should all be told to you;
For what became of this poor child
No mortal ever knew;
Nay—if a child to her was born
No earthly tongue could ever tell;
And if ’twas born alive or dead,
Far less could this with proof be said;
But some remember well,
That Martha Ray about this time
Would up the mountain often climb.

                             XV

“And all that winter, when at night
The wind blew from the mountain-peak,
’Twas worth your while, though in the dark,
The churchyard path to seek:
For many a time and oft were heard
Cries coming from the mountain head:
Some plainly living voices were;
And others, I’ve heard many swear,
Were voices of the dead:
I cannot think, whate’er they say,
They had to do with Martha Ray.

                             XVI

“But that she goes to this old Thorn,
The Thorn which I described to you,
And there sits in a scarlet cloak,
I will be sworn is true.
For one day with my telescope,
To view the ocean wide and bright,
When to this country first I came,
Ere I had heard of Martha’s name,
I climbed the mountain’s height:—
A storm came on, and I could see
No object higher than my knee.

                            XVII

“ ’Twas mist and rain, and storm and rain:
No screen, no fence could I discover;
And then the wind! in sooth, it was
A wind full ten times over.
I looked around, I thought I saw
A jutting crag,—and off I ran,
Head-foremost, through the driving rain,
The shelter of the crag to gain;
And, as I am a man,
Instead of jutting crag, I found
A Woman seated on the ground.

                            XVIII

“I did not speak—I saw her face;
Her face!—it was enough for me;
I turned about and heard her cry,
‘Oh misery! oh misery!’
And there she sits, until the moon
Through half the clear blue sky will go;
And when the little breezes make
The waters of the pond to shake,
As all the country know,
She shudders, and you hear her cry,
‘Oh misery! oh misery!’ ”

                             XIX

“But what’s the Thorn? and what the pond?
And what the hill of moss to her?
And what the creeping breeze that comes
The little pond to stir?”
“I cannot tell; but some will say
She hanged her baby on the tree;
Some say she drowned it in the pond,
Which is a little step beyond:
But all and each agree,
The little Babe was buried there,
Beneath that hill of moss so fair.

                             XX

“I’ve heard, the moss is spotted red
With drops of that poor infant’s blood;
But kill a new-born infant thus,
I do not think she could!
Some say, if to the pond you go,
And fix on it a steady view,
The shadow of a babe you trace,
A baby and a baby’s face,
And that it looks at you;
Whene’er you look on it, ’tis plain
The baby looks at you again.

                             XXI

“And some had sworn an oath that she
Should be to public justice brought;
And for the little infant’s bones
With spades they would have sought.
But instantly the hill of moss
Before their eyes began to stir!
And, for full fifty yards around,
The grass—it shook upon the ground!
Yet all do still aver
The little Babe lies buried there,
Beneath that hill of moss so fair.

                            XXII

“I cannot tell how this may be,
But plain it is the Thorn is bound
With heavy tufts of moss that strive
To drag it to the ground;
And this I know, full many a time,
When she was on the mountain high,
By day, and in the silent night,
When all the stars shone clear and bright,
That I have heard her cry,
‘Oh misery! oh misery!
Oh woe is me! oh misery!’ ”



Перевод на русский язык

Терн


      I



- Ты набредешь на старый Терн
И ощутишь могильный холод:
Кто, кто теперь вообразит,
Что Терн был свеж и молод!
Старик, он ростом невелик,
С двухгодовалого младенца.
Ни листьев, даже ни шипов -
Одни узлы кривых сучков
Венчают отщепенца.
И, как стоячий камень, мхом
Отживший Терн оброс кругом.


      II



Обросший, словно камень, мхом
Терновый куст неузнаваем:
С ветвей свисают космы мха
Унылым урожаем,
И от корней взобрался мох
К вершине бедного растенья,
И навалился на него,
И не скрывает своего
Упорного стремленья -
Несчастный Терн к земле склонить
И в ней навек похоронить.


      III



Тропою горной ты взойдешь
Туда, где буря точит кручи,
Откуда в мирный дол она
Свергается сквозь тучи.
Там от тропы шагах в пяти
Заметишь Терн седой и мрачный,
И в трех шагах за ним видна
Ложбинка, что всегда полна
Водою непрозрачной:
Ей нипочем и суховей,
И жадность солнечных лучей.


      IV



Но возле дряхлого куста
Ты встретишь зрелище иное:
Покрытый мхом прелестный холм
В полфута вышиною.
Он всеми красками цветет,
Какие есть под небесами,
И мнится, что его покров
Сплетен из разноцветных мхов
Девичьими руками.
Он зеленеет, как тростник,
И пышет пламенем гвоздик.


      V



О Боже, что за кружева,
Какие звезды, ветви, стрелы!
Там - изумрудный завиток,
Там - луч жемчужно-белый.
И как все блещет и живет!
Зачем же рядом Терн унылый?
Что ж, может быть, и ты найдешь,
Что этот холм чертами схож
С младенческой могилой.
Но как бы ты ни рассудил,
На свете краше нет могил.


      VI



Ты рвешься к Терну, к озерку,
К холму в таинственном цветенье?
Спешить нельзя, остерегись,
Умерь на время рвенье:
Там часто Женщина сидит,
И алый плащ ее пылает;
Она сидит меж озерком
И ярким маленьким холмом
И скорбно повторяет:
"О, горе мне! О, горе мне!
О, горе, горе, горе мне!"


      VII



Несчастная туда бредет
В любое время дня и ночи;
Там ветры дуют на нее
И звезд взирают очи;
Близ Терна Женщина сидит
И в час, когда лазурь блистает,
И в час, когда из льдистых стран
Над ней проносится буран, -
Сидит и причитает:
"О, горе мне! О, горе мне!
О, горе, горе, горе мне!"


      VIII



- Молю, скажи, зачем она
При свете дня, в ночную пору,
Сквозь дождь и снег и ураган
Взбирается на гору?
Зачем близ Терна там сидит
И в час, когда лазурь блистает,
И в час, когда из льдистых стран
Над ней проносится буран, -
Сидит и причитает?
Молю, открой мне, чем рожден
Ее унылый долгий стон?


      IX



- Не знаю; никому у нас
Загадка эта не под силу.
Ты убедишься: холм похож
На детскую могилу,
И мутен пруд, и мрачен Терн.
Но прежде на краю селенья
Взгляни в ее убогий дом,
И ежели хозяйка в нем,
Тогда лови мгновенье:
При ней никто еще не смел
Войти в печальный тот предел.


      X



- Но как случилось, что она
На это место год от году
Приходит под любой звездой,
В любую непогоду?
- Лет двадцать минуло с поры,
Как другу Марта Рэй вручила
Свои мечты и всю себя,
Вручила, страстно полюбя
Лихого Стива Хилла.
Как беззаботна, весела,
Как счастлива она была!


      XI



Родня благословила их
И объявила день венчанья;
Но Стив другой подруге дал
Другое обещанье;
С другой подругой под венец
Пошел, ликуя, Стив беспечный.
А Марта, - от несчастных дум
В ней скоро помрачился ум,
И вспыхнул уголь вечный,
Что тайно пепелит сердца,
Но не сжигает до конца.


      XII



Так полугода не прошло,
Еще листва не пожелтела,
А Марта в горы повлеклась,
Как будто что хотела
Там отыскать - иль, может, скрыть.
Все замечали поневоле,
Что в ней дитя, а разум дик
И чуть светлеет лишь на миг
От непосильной боли.
Уж лучше б умер подлый Стив,
Ее любви не оскорбив!


      XIII



О, что за грусть! Вообрази,
Как помутненный ум томится.
Когда под сердцем все сильней
Младенец шевелится!
Седой Джером под Рождество
Нас удивил таким рассказом:
Что, в матери набравшись сил,
Младенец чудо сотворил,
И к ней вернулся разум,
И очи глянули светло;
А там и время подошло.


      XIV



Что было дальше - знает Бог,
А из людей никто не знает;
В селенье нашем до сих пор
Толкуют и гадают,
Что было - или быть могло:
Родился ли ребенок бедный,
И коль родился, то каким,
Лишенным жизни иль живым,
И как исчез бесследно.
Но только с тех осенних дней
Уходит в горы Марта Рэй.


      XV



Еще я слышал, что зимой
При вьюге, любопытства ради,
В ночи стекались смельчаки
К кладбищенской ограде:
Туда по ветру с горных круч
Слетали горькие рыданья,
А может, это из гробов
Рвались наружу мертвецов
Невнятные стенанья.
Но вряд ли был полночный стон
К несчастной Марте обращен.


      XVI



Одно известно: каждый день
Наверх бредет она упорно
И там в пылающем плаще
Тоскует возле Терна.
Когда я прибыл в этот край
И ничего не знал, то вскоре
С моей подзорною трубой
Я поспешил крутой тропой
Взглянуть с горы на море.
Но смерклось так, что я не мог
Увидеть собственных сапог.


      XVII



Пополз туман, полился дождь,
Мне не было пути обратно,
Тем более что ветер вдруг
Окреп десятикратно.
Я озирался, я спешил
Найти убежище от шквала,
И, что-то смутно увидав,
Я бросился туда стремглав,
И предо мной предстала -
Нет, не расселина в скале,
Но Женщина в пустынной мгле.


      XVIII



Я онемел - я прочитал
Такую боль в погасшем взоре,
Что прочь бежал, а вслед неслось:
"О, горе мне! О, горе!"
Мне объясняли, что в горах
Она сидит безгласной тенью,
Но лишь луна взойдет в зенит
И воды озерка взрябит
Ночное дуновенье,
Как раздается в вышине:
"О, горе, горе, горе мне!"



      XIX



- И ты не знаешь до сих пор,
Как связаны с ее судьбою
И Терн, и холм, и мутный пруд,
И веянье ночное?
- Не знаю; люди говорят,
Что мать младенца удавила,
Повесив на кривом сучке;
И говорят, что в озерке
Под полночь утопила.
Но все сойдутся на одном:
Дитя лежит под ярким мхом.


      XX



Еще я слышал, будто холм
От крови пролитой багрится -
Но так с ребенком обойтись
Навряд ли мать решится.
И будто - если постоять
Над той ложбинкою нагорной,
На дне дитя увидишь ты,
И различишь его черты,
И встретишь взгляд упорный:
Какой бы в небе ни был час,
Дитя с тебя не сводит глаз.


      XXI



А кто-то гневом воспылал
И стал взывать о правосудье;
И вот с лопатами в руках
К холму явились люди.
Но тот же миг перед толпой
Цветные мхи зашевелились,
И на полета шагов вокруг
Трава затрепетала вдруг,
И люди отступились.
Но все уверены в одном:
Дитя зарыто под холмом.


      XXII



Не знаю, так оно иль нет;
Но только Терн по произволу
Тяжелых мрачных гроздьев мха
Все время гнется долу;
И сам я слышал с горных круч
Несчастной Марты причитанья;
И днем, и в тишине ночной
Под ясной блещущей луной
Проносятся рыданья:
"О, горе мне! О, горе мне!
О, горе, горе, горе мне!"


William Wordsworth's other poems:
  1. To The Supreme Being From The Italian Of Michael Angelo
  2. View From The Top Of Black Comb
  3. The Highland Broach
  4. Yes, It Was The Mountain Echo
  5. Mark The Concentrated Hazels That Enclose


Poems of other poets with the same name (Стихотворения других поэтов с таким же названием):

  • Joyce Kilmer (Джойс Килмер) The Thorn ("The garden of God is a radiant place")

    Распечатать стихотворение. Poem to print Распечатать стихотворение (Poem to print)

    Количество обращений к стихотворению: 10267


    Последние стихотворения


    To English version


  • Рейтинг@Mail.ru

    Английская поэзия. Адрес для связи eng-poetry.ru@yandex.ru